Friday, October 31, 2014

annotated line graph from Uber

With the email that hit my inbox earlier this afternoon, Uber has impressed me twice in the past week. The first time was in response to a simple comment that accompanied my '3' numerical rating (the lowest I've ever given): "With the world series game today, should have avoided stadium area." I had an email in my inbox from Uber's customer service within the hour agreeing that was a silly route given the Giants' game and reducing the price to what it would have been without the crazy traffic. Amazing.

And now they've done it again, this time via effective data viz. The annotated line graph below shows expected Uber demand over the course of the evening and into the wee hours of morning. This is one of those rare cases where they can get away without showing the y-axis values at all, since the relative peaks and valleys are more interesting (and meaningful) than the absolute numbers.


Nice job Uber. Though I must say this makes me happy to report that kiddie Halloween in my neighborhood is on foot, so no need to even think about surge-pricing here!

Speaking of which, I find it impossible to publish a post on Halloween without couple pics of my superhero family.


Happy Halloween!

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

SF housing cycles visualized

If you've shopped for real estate in San Francisco recently, you've likely experienced the crazy world of multiple offers, waived contingencies, and all-cash deals well above asking price. We've been house shopping here for nearly two years, without much to show except a jaded view of the market and an ever-increasing pile of home-for-sale flyers. My husband and I joke that our toddler will grow up thinking that's what you do on the weekends: go look at other people's houses.

If you've been in this situation, or a similar one, you've perhaps also wondered (like us) whether prices will continue to increase at the rate they have been, or if there is an elusive bubble that is about to pop. To that end, we came across the visual below, which depicts a simplified view of San Francisco housing market cycles over the past few decades.


If you've followed this blog for long, you might expect that I will next proceed to rip the above visual apart. But I am not going to. 

I actually really like it. 

Sure, there are some minor things that could be changed. But let's focus instead on the good: it's well-labeled, both in terms of titles and text annotation on the graph itself. There is a clear narrative that calls out some interesting things in the data. For example, over the past 30+ years, the period between a recovery beginning and a bubble popping has been about 6 years.

According to the graph, the last recovery began in 2012, which would put the next bubble pop at approximately 2018.

Which means there's still time to buy before we hit the peak...